Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

Program Contacts

Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention
1845 N. Fair Oaks Ave
Pasadena, CA 91103 Map »

626-744-6171 (Tel) | 626-744-6115 (Fax)

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Lead Recalls

Lead can be found in jewelry, toys, and even food. Click here to view recent product recalls due to high lead levels.

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Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention

The Pasadena Public Health Department’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program seeks to protect children from lead exposure in four important ways: by screening for lead, managing treatment, educating parents and organizing and investigating possible lead exposure in the Pasadena community.

Background

Group of Children on Grass 200x275 image

Lead poisoning is preventable. Find out how you can protect your family, at home and at work.

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Community Engagement

Child Eating Apple at Desk 200x275 image

Become a part of our community to reduce lead exposure, or request a presentation.

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For Providers

Children Being Examined by Doctor 200x275 image

Healthcare providers can find out more information on protocols for testing child blood lead levels.

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Background

Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Background

Lead poisoning during childhood is a major but preventable environmental health problem in Pasadena. Lead can harm a child’s brain, making it hard for a child to learn, pay attention and behave.  Lead can enter a child’s body through ingestion and skin contact with items containing lead. It will remain in the blood without treatment.

A very small amount of lead can lead to poisoning–just enough lead to equal one granule of sugar each day over a period of time will raise a child’s blood lead level enough to require treatment.  A child with lead poisoning may not seem sick, but some children may have stomach problems, trouble sleeping, less energy than normal or may have problems concentrating.

Lead can be found in many places inside and outside your home, such as

  • Lead-based paint (pre-1978)
  • Lead-contaminated soil, especially near busy roadways or factories
  • Lead-contaminated dust from paint or soil
  • Take-home exposure in dust from work or certain hobbies
  • Some imported food in cans
  • Imported home remedies (azarcon, greta, or pay-loo-ah)
  • Some toys
  • Imported traditional makeup (kohl, surma, or sindoor)
  • Metal jewelry
  • Imported or handmade pottery and tableware (dishes and pots)
  • Imported candies and ethnic foods and brightly-colored spices from outside the USA

The Pasadena Public Health Department’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program seeks to protect children from lead exposure.

Prevention
Occupations related to lead exposure
Environment
Home Renovations

Community Engagement

Community Engagement

COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND MEETINGS

The Child Lead Poisoning Prevention Program educates organizations, parent groups and caregivers about how to prevent lead poisoning at home, at school or daycare and anywhere else children frequent.  To request a presentation or education session, please call (626) 744-6171.

We also hold quarterly meetings with our community partners to share new information and network. If you would like more information about our next collaborative meeting please call (626)744-6171.

CASE MANAGEMENT

A public health nurse may be assigned to the child and his or her family when elevated blood lead levels are detected to help manage the child’s treatment and care. Clients with elevated blood lead levels will be referred to their medical provider for medical management. If the child does not have a regular medical provider, the nurse will refer the family to a medical provider.

BROCHURES AND FLYERS

Pregnant – Protect your newborn from lead

Embarazada – Proteja su recién nacido de plomo

Protect Your Child from Lead

Home remedies that may contain lead

Los remedios caseros que pueden contener plomo

Sources of lead around your home

Fuentes de plomo alrededor de su casa

For Providers

For Providers

The Pasadena Public Health Department recommends that all children get blood lead level screenings, and requires all of its clinics in the service area to conduct screenings to detect and prevent lead exposure.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that lead screening should begin at 9 to 12 months of age and be considered again at approximately 24 months of age when blood lead levels peak

For more information about lead screening recommendations, please visit the California Department of Public Health’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch.

Protocol

Product Recalls

Product Recalls

For more information about recent recalls due to Lead standard violations please visit the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission website.

Recent product recalls due to Violation of Lead Standard

M&M’s-Branded Jewelry 8/25/16

Mars Retail Group Recalls M&M’S-Branded Jewelry Due to Violation of Lead Standard

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GSI Outdoors Children’s Water bottle Exclusively at L.L. Bean 7/19/16

GSI Outdoors Recalls Children’s Water Bottles Due to Violation of Lead Standard; Sold Exclusively at L.L.Bean

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Things Remembered Children’s Jewelry 7/19/16

Things Remembered Recalls Children’s Jewelry Due to Violation of Lead Standard

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Far East Brokers Children’s Chairs and Swings 6/9/16

Far East Brokers Recalls Children’s Chairs and Swings Due to Violation of Federal Lead Paint Standard

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LaRose Industries Cra-Z-Jewelz Ultimate Gem Jewelry Machine 6/2/16

LaRose Industries Recalls Cra-Z-Jewelz Ultimate Gem Jewelry Machine Due to Violation of Lead Standard VIEW MORE  

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KHS America Children’s Musical Instrument 2/4/16

KHS America Recalls Children’s Musical Instrument Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard

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